Tag Archives: Cheetos

Portable + Tasty = Profitable

OK, class, it’s time for equations.

Nature Valley Sweet and Salty Nut Granola Bar + Gatorade G2 = BREAKFAST

Slim Jim + Handi-Snacks Crackers ‘n Cheez + apple = LUNCH

Capri Sun juice pouch + Cheetos snack size bag = AFTERNOON SNACK

There’s no need to get scientific here. If you can make it portable, you’ve just increased your food product’s chances of being relevant to consumers, and thus, purchased by them more often.

We need to make it happen. Especially with food products that are truly commodities. It’s that simple.

There are challenges, though. For example:

  • How do you balance freshness with portability, i.e. how do you make a tasty steak portable?
  • How do you balance “natural” with portability, i.e. how do you cut back on preservatives?

Technology and creativity can help solve these problems. After all, we’ve turned cranberries into a tasty snack called Craisins, made fruit into fun strips and created shelf-stable milk. We should be able to give consumers more protein, fiber and carbohydrate food options for life on the go.

Think word of mouth isn’t powerful? Think again, Chester!

What follows is a mostly unscientific and arrestingly informative investigation into the power of a friendly recommendation.

 

A couple days ago, a friend sent us an e-mail. Here’s the original text:

People,
 
I just need to take a moment here to tell you to have some Cheetos. I’m not kidding. I just had a bag, and it was glorious. I seem to have forgotten just how good they are – I generally avoid them because of the post-snacking finger gunk, but now I’m thinking it’s totally worth it. Seriously, I think they might be laced with antidepressants or something, because eating them was blissful.
 
Do yourself a favor. Get a bag.
 
Yours in positive snacking,
DCP

You can read the full post here.

We asked DCP to follow up with his friends and find out their responses and behavior after getting pinged by a friend about a snack brand. The idea was to see how the power of suggestion, when delivered by a friend, could be a powerful influencer.

Here’s what they said:

Friend 1: I’ve gotten Cheetos three times now.
 
Friend 2: I have a bag and yes, they are pretty darn good!

Friend 3: High fructose corn syrup friend…enjoy that coursing through your veins…..but I’m not condemning you…it makes me want some…Munchos did that for me a few weeks ago.

Friend 4: I LOVE CHEETOS. It’s the ingredients that keep me away – but the occasional cheeto spree is a necessity! (This is actually the same person ate Cheetos three times after getting the initial e-mail.)

Friend 5: You should go get yourself a bag of the Jalapeno Cheddar. CRACK IN A BAG. Wait a minute… doesn’t crack come in a bag anyways? Eh whatever, what do I know, just go get some! Cheetos that is.

Friend 6: I’m on board, DCP. I had a similar experience a couple years ago. Cheetos are the first thing I choose in the chip aisle and the only thing I choose to go with a sub sandwich.

Friend 7: I would have to say the crunchy are the best. I don’t think the crispy are very good.

Friend 8: Did you get the puffy or crunchy kind?  I myself am fond of the crunchy kind, though every day in highschool I ate the puffy kind.

Friend 9: Cheetos are good to eat. I also love Cool Ranch Doritos.

These comments represent really strong responses from nearly 20 percent of the recipient list. Not bad considering the cost (naught but time). Especially since these friends are reinforcing each other’s love for the brand each time they hit send.

Find out more about how to harness the power of the words of a friend by sending a shout-out of your own to thespoonful@shscom.com. We’ll put you in touch with our friends who know how to get your targets’ friends talking about your brand.

BTW, the Spoon’s response:

Fingers are for licking off. Pass the salty orange goodness!

And, yes, a couple people compared the product to drugs because they think they’re so good. We don’t condone illegal drug use and may have chosen better words ourselves, but please take it as a compliment. Thanks.

Worth noting: The power of consumer influence

This e-mail came across our desk earlier today:

People,
 
I just need to take a moment here to tell you to have some Cheetos. I’m not kidding. I just had a bag, and it was glorious. I seem to have forgotten just how good they are – I generally avoid them because of the post-snacking finger gunk, but now I’m thinking it’s totally worth it. Seriously, I think they might be laced with antidepressants or something, because eating them was blissful.
 
Do yourself a favor. Get a bag.
 
Yours in positive snacking,
DCP

We’ll let you know real-time how people in this person’s network responded to this actual word-of-mouth endorsement of a snack product.